Triggershorse demystified

I had an “Ozzy and Harriet” childhood. I was raised by two loving parents, had a younger sister and brother, and lived in a neighborhood teeming with friends. There was very little drama in our lives; we had a stay-at-home mom and a daddy who always held a job. When other mothers cheered the beginning of the school year because their children were returning to school, ours cried because she loved having us home.

Two houses separated my house from that of my best friend, Jackie. If we weren’t at our house, we were at hers, or playing in the cul de sac in front of our house. Our house was imagination central, with dress-up clothes and jewelry, tent-making blankets, and a tipi that doubled as an army hospital or a saloon, depending on the day. Mom was our best support and supply officer.

There was really only one rule, strictly enforced: Children were not allowed to quarrel with each other. If you couldn’t play pretty, you had to go home!

One beautiful summer afternoon, Jackie and I were playing “Gunsmoke” in the backyard, as usual. We were getting dressed up and organizing our play, when an argument erupted about which one of us got to be “Miss Kitty”. I felt that, since it was MY house, I should be Miss Kitty. Jackie, of course, thought that SHE, as my guest, should have that honor. Our squabbling brought Mom out back to referee.

After listening carefully to both sides of the issue, Mom passed judgment, “As far as I’m concerned, you can BOTH be TRIGGER’S HORSE if you want to!” she declared. (We knew, of course, that she meant to say “Roy Rogers’ horse, Trigger”, and did our best not to laugh in her face.) She then marched back into the house, and we dissolved in giggles, argument averted.

Since that day fifty-plus years ago, “You can be Trigger’s Horse” has been short-hand in our family for “there are no limits to what you can achieve”, and in Mom’s honor, I blog as “Trigger’s Horse”.

23 thoughts on “Triggershorse demystified”

  1. I love this story. First, of course you both wanted to be Kitty! She was awesome and knew how to take care of business. Second, what your mom said is so perfectly mom! Not quite right, but close enough that you know what she meant. Finally, that the whole thing inspired your pen name is awesome. Thanks for sharing this story!

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  2. Lauren, I have lost track of how many times over the years I have told someone, “You can be Trigger’s Horse if you want to!” Of course, what made it so funny when it happened was that my best friend and I thought Mom sounded SO ridiculous, but we didn’t dare laugh until she went back into the house. Then we nearly fell apart laughing. I’m glad you enjoyed it! – Fawn

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  3. Lovely.

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  4. Wonderful!

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  5. What a lovely story!

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  6. Fawn-
    I’d never read this before – what a loving memory to keep so very alive ๐Ÿ™‚
    AnnMarie

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    • Thank you, AnnMarie. My mom was pretty terrific, and I could write just about her and never run out of stories. – Fawn

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      • I knew there was a fantastic mom behind wonderful you ๐Ÿ™‚

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      • You are too kind, AnnMarie. But the only thing that was more fun than being a mom is being a grandmother! – Fawn

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      • And I learned how to be both from my own mom. – Fawn

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      • Fawn – Your family tree is blessed all around right through to the roots ๐Ÿ™‚
        Geez, I’m staying up later and later. I used to be in bed by 9. I’m like a dirty, rotten stay-out in my own home – I’m up ’til 11 many nights, woohoo!
        Though, I had way too much food at Applebee’s today for Max’s graduation lunch and one eye has just closed.
        Happy dreams ๐Ÿ™‚
        AnnMarie

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      • And if I go to bed at 11:00, everyone here assumes I am sick! I like the late nights when the house is quiet, which is why so often I don’t sit down to blog until nearly 11:30. I’m starting early tonight because my brain is on Convention overload and I skipped out on dinner with my roommates. It sounds like Max’s graduation celebration was lovely. – Fawn

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  7. Great story! Pleased to have found your blog and will return. Regards from Thom at the immortal jukebox (plugged in now).

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  8. I had a childhood like yours. Because of the ever changing world we live in, I worried my children wouldn’t have the same kind of memories. .Until I heard my daughter share a story about our Christmases. Among other things, she said I had always made the little things special. One of the things I love most about being a mother and a grandmother is building on and continuing an abiding sense of ‘family’.

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    • We were very lucky to have such childhoods. I remember that Christmas morning was always incredibly special, with just the right presents. Years later Mom shared with me that she always worried that we would think our special present wasn’t quite right, or that our gifts were unequal to those of our siblings. I was glad to reassure her that she had done just the right thing, always. Telling those family stories is part of why I am so passionate about my scrapbooking business, too. – Fawn

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  9. Thanks fro demystifying TRIGGERHORSE for us … its a great story! So many of us have stories about phrases like ‘triggerhorse’ that have developed a life and taken on so much meaning….

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  10. First, thanks for stopping by and Liking “Discarded Memories” — and how nice to see you joining me on my journey in this blogging space. Thanks to AnneMarie for sending you my way — I often have a morning “chat” with her over my first cup of coffee! That’s one of the things I find so wonderful about this blogging world – just began in March – is the Return Policy that seems indigenous to the process. A Like has me clicking to see who the person is, and so many times finding wonderful poetry, a fellow rejuvenator (see my About — am in my rejuvenatement period – definitely not retirement), amazing photography and painting, and just downright interesting people.
    Love this story — I had a pal named June (affectionately called Junie) who lived just down the street from me between the ages of 4 and 4th grade. We did everything together – until we moved to another area of town with a new school etc. After 60 + years, we reconnected – she’s in California and I’m in Boston — but she did a foliage tour that began in Boston so we had a breakfast together. Amazing! ๐Ÿ™‚ Childhood memories are the best — her favorite was Roy Rogers but mine was always Gene Autry! ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • Welcome, Lillian! I look forward to my visits with AnnMarie, even though we are on opposite sides of the country and she is awake far earlier than I…but as I generally blog late at night, she is the first one to see each post. I love your “rejuvenator” term, as even though I am retired from my careers and my daughter refers to me as the “stay-at-home grammy”, I am working a new part-time job and getting deeper into my community commitments. I can’t imagine just sitting around getting old! – Fawn

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